• Announcing PowerShell language support for Visual Studio Code and more!

    Today I am very happy to announce Developer Preview releases of two new projects that I hope will take your PowerShell development experience to the next level. Write and debug PowerShell scripts in Visual Studio Code! The first release is a new extension for Visual Studio Code which provides improved PowerShell language support including IntelliSense, code navigation, real-time script analysis...
  • The New Home of DSC Documentation

    I’m pleased to announce that our official PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) documentation now has a new home on MSDN . We heard your feedback loud and clear, and began working on a documentation platform that reflects our customer-focused approach to addressing that feedback with improvements to the content and structure of the DSC documentation. These changes were enabled and continue to...
  • Compromising Yourself with WinRM’s “AllowUnencrypted = True”

    One thing that’s a mixed blessing in the world of automation is how often people freely share snippets of code that you can copy and paste to make things work. Sometimes, this is a snippet of code / functionality that would have been hard or impossible to write yourself, and saves the day. Sometimes, this is a snippet that changes some configuration settings to finally make something work. For both...
  • Azure DSC Extension - Versions 1.0-2.3 no longer available

    NOTE: For information on OS support, and other features, please refer to our release history . Today we retired versions 1.0 to 2.3 of the Azure DSC Extension. These versions use preview versions of WMF 5.0 whose signing certificates have expired, so it is no longer possible to install them. If any of these versions are already installed on your VMs they will continue to run, but you will not be able...
  • DSC Resource Kit updates are here!

    You may be wondering what’s happening in the area of DSC Resource Kit and if that’s the case, read on. Over the last month we’ve accepted 47 pull requests, fixed 16 issues, updated 9 modules and added 5 new resources! The new resources are xExchMaintenanceMode, xExchMailboxServer, xExchTransportService and xExchEventLogLevel in the xExchange module as well as xDefaultGatewayAddress shipped as part...
  • PowerShell: predict the future via TechEd

    PowerShell: predict the future via TechEd Summary: Microsoft Scripting Guy Ed Wilson talks about Windows PowerShell and the future of the technology Microsoft Scripting Guy, Ed Wilson, is here. Where ever I go, people always want to know about what is coming up next. What is our roadmap for management. Or, what is the future of PowerShell. The future of PowerShell? Dude, this one is...
  • How to retrieve node information from DSC pull server

    As described in “Push vs. Pull Mode” blog, DSC configuration can be applied on target nodes using pull or push mechanism. In this blog I will talk about how to retrieve node information from DSC pull server. When the node pulls a configuration from the pull server and applies it locally, it can either succeed or fail. DSC compliance endpoint stores the configuration run status and node information...
  • Wish I can author DSC Resource in C#!!

    In previous blog , we learned how one can use their PowerShell skills to author DSC resources very easily. Still there are folks (we met some at TechEd NA) who want to author their DSC resources using C# because they are more productive with it than PowerShell language. Well, you can fully leverage the power of DSC by writing your resources in C#. In this blog, we will explore how you can write a C#...
  • Setting up an Internal PowerShellGet Repository

    At TechEd, we announced and released an early version of PowerShellGet: a package manager for PowerShell modules. The response was positive, and many people asked the same type of question: “Can I set up my own internal repository for PowerShellGet?” Many enterprise-oriented houses want the ability to create private module repositories (without sharing them with the world). Many security...
  • Announcing Windows PowerShell Desired State Configuration for Linux

    For those of you fortunate enough to be at TechEd North America last week, you might have seen Jeffrey Snover announcing Windows PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) for Linux ! (If you missed that session, you can watch a replay of it online ). We are excited to announce the initial availability of this feature with the release of a CTP of DSC for Linux at GitHub.com. With DSC for Linux, you...
  • Windows Management Framework 5.0 Preview May 2014 is now available

    We’re excited to announce Windows Management Framework 5.0 Preview May 2014 , a new package publicizing new and exciting management technologies, is now available for download on Download Center! This version of the preview includes everything in the Windows Management Framework 5.0 Preview that was released in April of 2014 and a new module called PowerShellGet. This new package installs...
  • Understanding Import-DscResource Keyword in Desired State Configuration

    Desired State Configuration resources are used to model and change the state of different components of the system. In an earlier blog post , we discussed details about deploying and discovering those resources and introduced Import-DscResource dynamic keyword. In this post, we will discuss some more details about the usage and internal working of this dynamic keyword. This keyword is only available...
  • Debug Mode in Desired State Configuration

    The DSC engine caches resources implemented as a PowerShell module for efficiency purposes. This can sometimes turn out to be annoying, when you are authoring a resource and testing it simultaneously. The only way to cause DSC to load the newer version every time is to explicitly kill the process hosting the DSC engine. As part of the WMF5 CTP release , we have introduced a new property for configuring...
  • A World of Scripts at your Fingertips – Introducing Script Browser

    <Today we have a guest blog entry from Microsoft Customer Services & Support and the Garage> Update: Version 1.1 of the Script Browser is out. Check out the announcement here: http://blogs.technet.com/b/onescript/archive/2014/04/29/here-comes-the-update-of-script-browser-amp-script-analyzer-1-1.aspx To reuse script samples on the Internet, the following steps seem quite familiar to IT Pros...
  • Collecting the Output of Remoting Commands

    One question we often get around PowerShell Remoting is "How do I collect the output of remoting commands into a different file for each computer?" For example, you want to invoke a remote command across 1,000 machines as a multi-threaded job and then create 1,000 text files for their output. This is in fact impressively easy in PowerShell due to the automatic properties that we add to remote output...
  • What’s in a name? Using prefixes in PowerShell.

    We’ve talked about this in the past but it’s time for a reminder. PowerShell uses prefixes in front of nouns to avoid name collisions. Imagine how many collisions there would be if people used the noun “USER” directly. Instead, we have cmdlets *-ADUser, *-VPNUser, and *-RDUser. The use of the prefix avoids name collisions. When there is a name collision, the customer must specify the full name of the...
  • Windows Management Framework V5 Preview

    The Windows Management Framework V5 Preview is out! Check out Jeffrey Snover's announcement here . The preview contains updates to PowerShell Desired State Configuration, as well as two new features: NetworkSwitch cmdlets and Windows PowerShell OneGet. OneGet is designed to dramatically simplify how you discover and install software packages, while the NetworkSwitch cmdlets allow you to manage Certified...
  • Configuring an Azure VM using PowerShell DSC

    At the //build/ conference today, Jeffery Snover demonstrated bringing up an Azure virtual machine and configuring it using DSC and the Custom Script VM extension. We are sharing the scripts he used to accomplish this. These scripts present an example of how PowerShell DSC can be used with the Azure boot agent to create and automatically configure Azure VMs. In order to use these scripts you must...
  • DSC Resource Kit Wave 3

    In September, Microsoft released PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) with twelve built in resources. Three months later (December), we added eight more resources with Wave One of the DSC Resource Kit. Two months after that (February), we totaled fourteen additional resources with Wave Two of the DSC Resource Kit. Can you guess what happens now, the month after the release...
  • PowerShell Summit North America

    We are delighted to draw attention to this year's PowerShell Summit - an excellent community run PowerShell event. As described by PowerShell.Org: Come meet the Windows PowerShell team, PowerShell MVPs, independent experts, and your peers and colleagues in the PowerShell universe! The PowerShell Summit is a one-of-a-kind annual event, and this year it’s April 27-29 right in Microsoft’s home town...
  • Want to Automatically Configure Your Machines Using DSC at Initial Boot-up?

    Often times, IT Pros want to automate software installation and configuration upon a machine’s initial boot-up. This blog will walk you through how to use Windows PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) to do this. We will show you how to prepare and inject DSC configurations into your bootable media (such as VHDs), so that they are executed during the initial boot-up process. We will discuss...
  • Reusing Existing Configuration Scripts in PowerShell Desired State Configuration

    You are an expert in PowerShell DSC (or maybe not an expert, just someone playing around with configurations in DSC) and have already written fairly large and complex configurations for configuring your environment/data center. Everything is working well and you are a great fan of DSC. There’s only one problem: your work is complicated . Before long, you have a configuration that is hundreds or thousands...
  • Configuring a SQL High Availability Group with DSC

    Let's use DSC to configure something complicated! In past blogs, we’ve shown you how to use Windows PowerShell Desired State Configuration ( DSC ) to configure relatively simple systems. However, the technologies you deal with on a day to day basis can sometimes become complicated. Don’t worry, DSC can still help simplify configuration. Let’s use SQL AlwaysOn Availability Group ( AG ) as a example...
  • DSC Diagnostics Module– Analyze DSC Logs instantly now!

      Have you ever witnessed a DSC Configuration run where you had no idea about what it might have done behind the scenes? Well, then your worries end here! During any DSC Operation, the DSC engine writes into windows event logs, which are like bread crumbs that the engine leaves along the way during any execution. If you read the blog here about DSC troubleshooting, you could learn how to use the Get...
  • Need more DSC Resources? Announcing DSC Resource Kit Wave 2

    Good news everyone! Starting today, you can use Windows PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) to configure Active Directory and SQL Server (including High Availability Groups) . We are pleased to release the next wave of the DSC Resource Kit – one that enables you to start using DSC to solve your real world problems and scenarios. When we shipped DSC in Windows Server 2012 R2, we shipped...