When you change variables, you might need to clean up later and ensure that you reverted them back to some default value – unless you use custom scopes. Yesterday, we looked at how console application errors can be handled, and when you look at the code again, you see that a lot of effort was taken to restore the $ErrorActionPreference system variable:

try
{
    # set the preference to STOP
    $old = $ErrorActionPreference
    $ErrorActionPreference = 'Stop'
    # RUN THE CONSOLE EXE THAT MIGHT EMIT AN ERROR,
    # and redirect the error channel #2 to the
    # output channel #1
    net user doesnotexist 2>&1
}

catch [System.Management.Automation.RemoteException]
{
    # catch the error emitted by the EXE,
    # and do what you want
    $errmsg = $_.Exception.Message
    Write-Warning $errmsg
}

finally
{
    # reset the erroractionpreference to what it was before
    $ErrorActionPreference = $old
}

A much easier way would be a custom scope:

& {
    try
    {
        # set the preference to STOP
        $ErrorActionPreference = 'Stop'
        # RUN THE CONSOLE EXE THAT MIGHT EMIT AN ERROR,
        # and redirect the error channel #2 to the
        # output channel #1
        net user doesnotexist 2>&1
    }

    catch [System.Management.Automation.RemoteException]
    {
        # catch the error emitted by the EXE,
        # and do what you want:
        $errmsg = $_.Exception.Message
        Write-Warning $errmsg
    }
}

The construction & { [code] } creates a new scope, and any variable defined inside of it will be deleted again once the scope exits. This is why in above example, $ErrorActionPreference is automatically restored to whatever it was before.

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