When you override Out-Default to do something meaningful, you really want to make sure the old behavior isn’t lost, and instead just something new is added. Here is an example that uses the concept of “Proxy Functions”.

The original input is forwarded (proxied) to the original Out-Default cmdlet. In addition, the function opens its own private Out-GridView window and echoes the output to this window as well.

function Out-Default
{
    param(
        [switch]
        $Transcript,

        [Parameter(ValueFromPipeline=$true)]
        [psobject]
        $InputObject
    )

    begin
    {
        $pipeline = { Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\Out-Default @PSBoundParameters }.GetSteppablePipeline($myInvocation.CommandOrigin)
        $pipeline.Begin($PSCmdlet)

        $grid = { Out-GridView -Title 'Results' }.GetSteppablePipeline()
        $grid.Begin($true)
    
    }

    process
    {
        $pipeline.Process($_)
        $grid.Process($_)
    }

    end
    {
        $pipeline.End()
        $grid.End()
    }

} 

To remove the override, simply run:

 
PS C:\> del function:Out-Default
 

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